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Articles in "The Road to Resilience"

Throughout the time I’ve been writing this column, I’ve tried to point out ways in which we as individuals and as a community could become more resilient to changes that are and will be occurring in our world.

In January of 2012, I wrote a summary in that I was surprised to hear that a recent study found Vashon Island was the most liberal city in the US.  It was the first time I have ever seen Vashon singled out in a national context for anything.  My second thought was that I, probably like most of you, suspected as much.

In January of 2012, I wrote a summary in this column of the decision at the Durban UN Climate Conference to kick the can down the road with a promise to produce a binding agreement at the 2015 conference that would take affect in 2020.  Previous  to Durban, in Copenhagen, the world agreed that global warming must be limited to 2 degrees Celsius. 

I’ve often said that we live in extraordinary times that call for extraordinary measures.  Although I don’t like to get into political races in this column, what is happening now is truly extraordinary and deserves some attention.

I still haven’t gotten any conservative takers for a mutually respectful, ongoing discussion of common ground for political action.  In my previous column, I mentioned that I was sick and tired of the mutual demonizing by liberals and conservatives, when, in the end, we all have basically the same human wants and needs.

I want to look at the big, broken political picture again this week, but I promise that there are definite actions you can take, here and now, to help fix it. As you are probably aware, some of us see a climate crisis while others see too much regulation, some of us see an insufficient safety net while others see a spoiled populace, some see insufficient taxation while others see excessive spending.

I want to look at the big, broken political picture again this week, but I promise that there are definite actions you can take, here and now, to help fix it. As you are probably aware, some of us see a climate crisis while others see too much regulation, some of us see an insufficient safety net while others see a spoiled populace, some see insufficient taxation while others see excessive spending.

Recently, on the Facebook site, Future Water Vashon, Michael Laurie, local home energy consultant and green systems proponent, posted an account of his visit to the building inspector at the King County Department of Public Health to discuss the legality of compost toilet/graywater systems for onsite sewage disposal.

The most distressing aspect of trying to cope with the physical, economic, and political crises we face in the world today is our inability to act because of complete polarization of our body politic in the US.  Riding storm-tossed seas in a leaky boat, we are arguing about whether we should paint our oars red or blue.

This last Friday, I watched in utter amaDuring the 2008 presidential election, Obama spoke with a man on the street, later to be known as “Joe the Plumber.“ Joe asked Obama how his tax plan would he, as a small businessman, would be affected.

This last Friday, I watched in utter amazement, joy, and gratitude as the rain pounded the ground to the accompaniment of lightning and thunder!   In the 44 years that I have lived here, I have never seen a dry spell like the one we have been experiencing.

There are two important initiatives out there right now that you should know about.  Many of you have signed one or both, but I will try to explain them for those that need more information. The more straightforward one is I 735, which is intended to overturn the Supreme Court “Citizen’s United” decision. 

This is the 100th “Road to Resilience” column. I originally began writing it as an outlet for ideas that were surfacing in our Transition Vashon group.  The Transition Network, of which we were a member, began in Great Britain in 2004.

I just finished reading The Soil Will Save Us by Kristin Ohlsen.  I highly recommend this book.  Don’t be put off by the schlocky title; it is a well-researched and incisive report on the state of knowledge about soil.  It shows that much of the carbon now in the atmosphere could be locked up in healthy soil.  However, it is the nature of healthy soil that was most enlightening for me.

It has been good to see a lot more people using their bikes as practical transportation.  I love to see mothers with their kids or cargo in bike trailers.  There always seems to be a bike or two outside the grocery stores.

In recent years, I’ve really gotten tired of the common use of simplistic labels that cause us to bypass our critical faculties to accept judgements about matters that our leaders and pundits would rather not look into too closely.

In recent years, I’ve really gotten tired of the common use of simplistic labels that cause us to bypass our critical faculties to accept judgements about matters that our leaders and pundits would rather not look into too closely.

A friend of mine recently said, “If you are born on this planet, you are an owner.”  It seems that a lot of the problems we have, especially today, revolve around who owns what.    It has always seemed ridiculous to me that a person born into our country does not have an unalienable right to stand in one place, much less claim the space to build a shelter and grow or forage for some food.

Those of us that place great hope on a renewable energy future have been slapped down repeatedly by the “knowledgeable and mature” analysts that tell us that renewables will never supply more than a pittance of the energy our world needs in the foreseeable future

Here is good news! Most of the above named article by Navi Radjou and Jaideep Prabhu with the permission of the website, Project Syndicate is reprinted here:

Living is a business in which we derive what we need from stuff that we find around us and then must somehow deal with what is left over or transformed through use as “waste.” When there was lots of stuff and plenty of room for “waste,” using as much as we could and dumping the leftovers in a hole was just fine.

My main concern in the Road to Resilience is how we approach and prepare for what many see as a major civilizational paradigm shift.  What is forcing the shift is the arrival of natural limits to the further development of the existing political, economic, and social institutions we rely on today.  At the base of it is a profligate use of resources and poor housekeeping.

By now, we’re all pretty familiar with the term “locavore.” that is, the idea that it is better to eat foods that are sourced locally.  One reason is that, all things being equal, the nutritional value is better because the food is fresher, and we are more likely to be able to verify what has been used to produce it.

This week, I’d like to further discuss the basic premise of Naomi Klein’s new book, This Changes Everything.  The “this” she is referring to is human-caused climate change.  Up until now, the general consensus has been that taking environmental factors more seriously in making our economic decisions is all that is required to mitigate this crisis.